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Ruthless Prioritization

That’s the name of the best blog post I’ve read (and, most importantly intend to use): Ruthless Prioritization.  For years I set priorities with various projects, and advised clients to ‘rigourously’ set priorities. Manage priorities.  And I will now readily admit that managing priorities in a busy, small consulting firm was relatively straightforward; priorities were set by the size and significance of the client. But now, in library operations, I struggle with priorities day in and day out. Struggle? Ha! I don’t just struggle — I flounder – I fail. Miserably.

So as soon as I saw a post on “ruthless prioritization” I clicked on it!  Admittedly, I expected to read a mamby-pamby post on the “importance of focusing on what’s important”, but hallelujah! This post gives a workable framework. Yes, the framework is designed and used by tech firms. But isn’t that perfect for libraries to adopt? Think about it — our products and services need to have the same urgency and life-span as those of tech firms, don’t they? Aren’t we competing with tech firms in many ways — to seize and retain people’s attention?  Consider this statement:

Show me a team that has no bugs at launch,

and I’ll show you one that should have shipped a long time ago.

Doesn’t that apply to library services and products? Don’t we keep refining, refining, refining to ensure there are no issues, no implications, no problems? Yet the only way to identify issues, implications and problems is to get the service/product OUT there for people to experience.

There’s no point in me synthesizing Brandon Chu’s post; read it and adopt the framework. 

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